Indigo Production Photo Gallery

Indigo Production Photo Gallery
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Indigo Production Pays Dogon, Mali

Among other locations in Mali, indigo plants are harvested and processed into dye in the Dogon village of Ennde on the Baniagara Escarpment of Mali. There is a Woman's Cooprative Association in Ennde through which local Dogon ladies participate in making indigo cloth to sell. The ladies receive income directly from the cooperative, and through this source have an independent cash flow which is separate from that of the male members of their families.

The indigo plants are harvested near the village and the dye is processed using local methods. The raw cotton used in the cloth that the ladies dye is also grown near the village where traditionally the men do the weaving. The raw cotton is harvested, then spun into yarn by hand using handmade spindles. The white yarn is then woven into narrow strips of cloth on hand looms. As with the production of Mud Cloth, or Bogolan, the narrow strips are sewn together when wider pieces of cloth are desired. This fabric is often refered to as "six" or "eight" piece for example, which describes the approximate width of the finished cloth. Before dying, the ladies sew thread pattens in the fabric, which when removed after dying, create the white designs in the finished cloth.

The production of indigo cloth is  a long standing tradition in Ennde and visitors to the village can visit a small museum in which the production process is explained and samples of the indigo plants are displayed.

Product Code DogonIndigo
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Indigo Production by the Dogon People

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Thank you! I am glad to find this article about the villagers benefiting financially from the production of their high quality cotton fabrics woven and dyed. In our museum collections, I have mud cloth examples of the artistry and skills of the people I hope their museum expand and soon have an on-line page. Cordially, T.R. Kemp (Sep 13 2013, 07:02 am)
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